We are all connected through Sacred Art

  The Sacred Art of life, geometry – it is exhibited in patterns through nature, it forms our own human design and we see it, maybe more often than we realise, in cultural art and architecture. It is even in the unseen. It is in everything.

Just appreciating …

We don’t all, necessarily, know a whole lot about geometry – it’s such a deep topic delving right into the heart of creation and spanning space and time – but just a grateful awareness that there is an endless reflection of geometric patterns throughout our Universe can bring greater appreciation and value of life and a sense of connection to something Divine … particularly when we consider that we are part of that great picture.

There might be times when we feel we’ve lost touch with that Sacred Presence or Higher Truth – somewhere between the job, the school run, the housework and everything else we have to juggle – but we never really do lose touch at all. It’s not possible. That connection is secured by natural fact … It is constant and unconditional and no matter where we are emotionally, mentally or spiritually we are never exempt from it. We are always One. Even when our mind is elsewhere, on an unseen level we’re communicating, in the same language used by the stars, with everything around us. Guilt or regret at any moments that have gone seemingly unnoticed are irrelevant, in the grand scheme of things, and serve only to distract us from the magnificence of this very moment.

Seeing is believing

Let me show you this video that was just shared with me – the patterns that sound waves produce will astound you. When you watch this I invite you to consider all the unseen possibilities, the silent language of the Sacred Art that is around you at all times. Furthermore I hope that should you ever feel lonely, disconnected or defeated you remember the beautiful truth that surrounds you.

Sacred Art

Many cultures use specifically detailed geometric designs to impart the energy of a higher message – for example, the Native American Medicine Wheel, the Jewish Kabbalah and the Mantra or Yantra of the Buddhists and Hindus. As Karen L French explains in her fascinating book ‘Gateway to the Heavens’, these works of art ‘have been drawn throughout the centuries to give tangible form to the intangible order that unites everything in the Universe. In a sense, they are like mathematical equations, revealing the real nature of the Universe through abstract forms.’   Create your own mandala You too can impart the energy of the Divine Connection – making tangible, the intangible and enhancing your own perception of the vast gifts of life.   If you’d like to create your own mandala, here are four pointers, to get you started, from the ‘Mandala Source Book’ by David Fontana and Lisa Tenzin:   1 – It must not be the result of conscious effort. If you construct a mandala by thinking about it, you will produce something that may look attractive but will essentially be an artificial exercise. The mandala should arise from your unconscious, it may be that your mandala will appear in your mind spontaneously during a meditation session. Or you may wish to sit before a blank sheet of paper, empty your mind of thoughts, and just draw whatever comes to mind. Be patient – it may take several attempts before something arrives that seems to speak directly to you.   2 – the mandala is not simply a drawing inside a circle or square. It should have a recognizable symmetry and convey a sense of balance and harmony. It should represent something beyond its immediate appearance, something that you feel will reveal itself little by little as you meditate upon it.   3 – never try to force the pace. If something meaningful does not arise, no matter. Don’t see this as failure. You may prefer to stay with the mandalas created by others. Traditional mandalas have stood the test of time, meaning that they represent something profound and enduring in ourselves.   4 – don’t be afraid to put your mandala to one side if you become dissatisfied with it. Don’t allow yourself to become attached to it just because it’s your own. It is simply there to help you. It is a tool and if it ceases to be useful to you, be prepared to let it go.   And here’s a tutorial taking you through the steps of how to draw a mandala:
  Meditating upon a mandala Instead of creating your own mandala, you may feel more moved to meditate on, or draw inspiration from, one of the 150 beautiful, modern mandalas from the ‘Mandala Source Book’.  Fire around the lotus David Fontana                                                                  – The Flaming Lotus by David Fontana

As with all geometric patterns, mandalas hold a special message – one that speaks a language understood by intuition, insight or the sixth sense. What will the world within our world reveal to you?   One love,   Louisa